A Seizure from my Point of View

Background information: I had a traumatic brain injury in 2015, since then I have experienced what we can only guess to be hundreds of seizures. Here I want to talk about what my seizures are like, not everyone’s are the same so I am only speaking for myself.


It all starts with a “trigger”. My triggers are flashing lights, certain sounds, or high stress levels. It all starts in my eyes. I feel them begin to twitch and eventually roll back, then everything goes black as I lose consciousness. This is when the actual seizure takes place, I have no memory of this part. Then I wake up, but I am paralyzed to a degree. To people around me it appears I am still unconscious, but I can actually hear everything, it’s just hard to comprehend. As I become more conscious I begin to understand what people are saying and I am able to open my eyes. I look around and everything feels like it’s moving, basically like a bad case of vertigo. By the time I am strong enough to stand up, somewhere between 10-20 minutes have passed since the seizure. The only thing I cannot do at this point is communicate. My words are slurred and stuttered and don’t always make sense. It’s both frustrating and terrifying because there’s no way to tell anyone if I was injured during the seizure. There was a specific time I big through my tongue, but no one knew because I couldn’t speak. Seizures are different for every individual. In a separate blog, I will explain my type of seizures and what that means for my life.


Thank you for taking the time to read this and educate yourself on how my seizures work. The biggest thing to remember is to be understanding when dealing with people who have seizures. It’s a heavy burden to carry, and often we find ourselves in need of support from others.

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43 thoughts on “A Seizure from my Point of View”

    1. I actually just hit my 6 months mark of no seizures on July 1st (it’ll be a separate blog). We finally found the combination of medicine that seems to be working for me. It’s not worth changing it at this point for me, but if it works for others then I support their choice to use it!

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  1. My Friend has a cousin around 6 years old and he has seizures almost everyday. My first time seeing that scared me because I didn’t know what to do. But when I looked around everybody was so calm about the situation. And I asked my friend “what going on?” “Is he ok?” She told me that if he gets to excited about some or just anything it’s like a trigger and he will instantly start having a seizure.

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    1. Everyone’s triggers are different! I know someone who has a seizure at the sight of blood! It’s definitely an up-hill battle, but once you learn your triggers, things get a little easier.

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  2. I can’t even imagine how scary it must be to feel like you’re not in control of your body during a seizure. I’m glad you’ve found a medication combination that’s working for you- that’s so great!

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    1. Thank you! It was an up-hill battle to find what worked for me (3 years to be exact), but God has a plan for every struggle I face.

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  3. I can not image going through something like that! I know it is a very scary and stressful ordeal. Glad you and your doctor have found the right combination of medication to control the seizures.

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    1. Thanks for reading! Learning what medicines work for you is a huge part of the journey. But thankfully that part appears to be over. 🙂

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    1. Thanks for reading! Information on what seizures are like for people who have them is slim to none, so having people read my writing means a lot!

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  4. Breanna,
    thank you so much for sharing with us. Id love to hear more and continue reading about you. My brother has had 3 TBIs and has seizures. I can’t imagine how frustrating it is to be so out of control of something like that. It has pained me to see him suffer, and I yearn more understanding from him than what he can give me. Blogs like these give me hope to better communicate with him and be able to comfort him and give him what he needs when the time comes. Or in the least be able to read him a little better with less frustration and discomfort on his end. As you said, its different for most individuals but even small insight can make all the difference!
    Erin

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    1. Thank you so much. I’m sorry that you’re brother is on this journey to, but he is so not alone! I was only 15 when I had my brain injury and at that age, to say I was frustrated was an understatement. I was crushed by the idea of never being normal and I’m sure others feel this as well. I believe a big part to overcoming it all is to accept it for what it is. I cling onto my faith and I try to stay positive even when things get hard. The best advice I can give is to be there. I’ve lost many people because they couldn’t “handle” my condition. Having someone by your side makes a world of difference, and I’m sure your brother feels this way about you. He’ll be in my prayers as he continues his journey.

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  5. So glad you’ve found meds that work for you! as a friend of someone who suffered from seizures due to another health condition it has always been something i have been very aware of. i always get angry around holidays when i see the bright flashing lasers people put on their houses because of it. awareness i so very important

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    1. Thank you!! Before my brain injury I was oblivious to what lights could do to someone. I had my very own flashing earrings I wore to Christmas parties. Looking back, I’ve learned so much so I do my best to educate others because I know that, in most cases, they mean no harm.

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  6. Very great description pre and post seizure. Really had no idea that it took this long before being able to talk or stand. Glad your able to talk about it

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    1. Thank you!! It’s definitely different for everyone, but as for me, I’ve learned my limitations and how to get through it.

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  7. I’m sorry that this awful thing happened to you, but it makes me happy to see how in return you use this to educate from personal experience. You are strong. Keep on keeping on!!

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    1. Thank you so much!! I’m a strong believer that God has a plan for it so I proudly tell my testimony to anyone who will listen.

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  8. I have read about seizures trying to educate myself on them, but never have I read a first person account of how they happen and what it feels like. You wrote it so well that I was able to transfer my mind and put myself in your shoes, although it it something I cannot comprehend as well as you do since you have actually gone through them. I cannot imagine not being in control of your body, of communicating as you watch the world around you move. Thank you so much for allowing us to get a glimpse of your life and educating us in this. Stay strong!

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    1. It was strange writing it because I was wondering if anyone would care to read, but the responses I’ve gotten have been all positive and I am so thankful for it all. Thank you for taking the time to educate yourself!

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  9. My husband has sporadic seizures also, though his episodes are a little different. He describes a halo affect on his vision before the onset which fortunately gives him enough time to lie down or in one instance, pull over and turn the car off. That tends to be the last thing he remembers before regaining consciousness after the seizure even if a few minutes pass before it actually starts. I’ve had entire conversations with him before a seizure that he can’t remember or has difficulty remembering later.

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    1. I understand that. Memory loss is a HUGE part of a seizure. I have entire days I don’t remember, but I also have a support system that is there for me even when they have to remind me a hundred times. Your husband is very lucky to have you stay beside him through it all.

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      1. It helps that we (his parents and I) sort of “review” the events right before the onset of the seizure. He begins by telling us the last thing he remembers, then we fill him in. A lot of times he will begin to remember bits and pieces of conversations.

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      2. That’s a huge thing. Reminding us of what’s going on calms us down and gives us peace of mind. Thank you for all you do!

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  10. Thank you for sharing your personal experience with seizures. I have witnessed someone having a seizure in my very on eyes. I love how it is so descriptive to where I can imagine.

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    1. Thank you! It’s very difficult to be a bystander to us, but staying by someone’s side makes all the difference for us when we wake up.

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  11. I’m so proud of you for your transparency with us about living your life with your seizures – it’s not easy to open up to strangers about vulnerabilities; your strength is incredibly inspiring! Thank you for sharing! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much!!! I think holding it all in is even harder than putting it out there sometimes. Bringing it all to light takes away the “elephant in the room”.

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  12. Thanks for sharing your story, Breanna. Very interesting read. I hope your story and others helps educate and improve our understanding on seizures and other invisible illnesses. I think this information is critical, especially for educators and caregivers.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much. Getting the information out there is half the battle, but it’s so important to tell your story even when it’s hard.

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